US Breached Kim/Trump Summit Agreement Straightaway

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US Breached Kim/Trump Summit Agreement Straightaway

by Stephen Lendman (stephenlendman.orgHome – Stephen Lendman)

Washington can never be trusted – what’s vital for all nations to understand in dealings with the US, wanting everything its own way in return for empty promises.

Breaching the Kim/Trump agreement came nearly straightaway after mid-June summit talks. 

One or more follow-up summits won’t likely achieve what the first ever formal meeting between a US and North Korean leader failed to accomplish.

Time and again, Washington breaches international treaties and agreements. It’s been longstanding policy since the republic’s inception. Rare exceptions prove the rule.

America’s rage for controlling planet earth, its resources and populations at the expense of world peace clearly shows its opposition to cooperative relations with other nations, wanting them colonized, controlled and exploited.

Mid-June Kim/Trump summit talks were for naught. DLT may genuinely want improved US relations with North Korea.

Pompeo and Bolton in charge of the regime’s geopolitical agenda undermined his likely good intentions.

They want unbending pressure, full denuclearization, elimination of DPRK ballistic missiles, and full compliance with other US demands before implementing anything Kim and Trump agreed on.

Unacceptable US hostility toward North Korea has persisted since WW II ended. Nothing going forward suggests a policy change.

Washington needs enemies to unjustifiably justify its imperial rage for dominance. Peace, stability, and cooperation with all nations defeat its agenda – why improved US relations with North Korea remain unattainable under Republicans and undemocratic Dems.

The DPRK is a longstanding US punching bag. Truman’s aggression never ended. An uneasy armistice persists with no likely prospect for Washington agreeing to a peace treaty, formally ending the 1950s war.

Nor will the Trump regime guarantee North Korea’s security, agree to remove unacceptable sanctions, and establish normal bilateral relations unless its leadership accepts vassal status.

Addressing the Security Council last week, Pompeo discussed North Korea, saying:

“Until the final denuclearization of the DPRK is achieved and fully verified…all UN Security Council resolutions pertaining to North Korea” will be enforced – without essential good faith Trump regime reciprocity, what bilateral agreements and normalized relations are all about.

Pompeo: “(A)ny…path North Korea may choose (short of full denuclearization) will inevitably lead to ever-increasing isolation and pressure.”

Unacceptable US hostility and belligerence toward the DPRK began long before it sought and developed nuclear weapons.

Nothing suggests Washington will soften its position toward the country – short of sacrificing its sovereign rights to unacceptable US demands beyond denuclearization, wanting the country colonized and controlled – or maintained as an adversary along with China to justify Washington’s hostile Asia/Pacific military footprint.

Pompeo, Bolton, and other Trump regime hardliners want harsh sanctions maintained without letup – what never should have been imposed in the first place, waging war on the DPRK by other means, ordinary people in the country harmed most.

What Pompeo called “the spirit and letter of Security Council resolutions,” imposing unacceptably harsh sanctions on the country, should be rescinded straightaway – Russia and China taking the lead to eliminate them, notably because of DPRK good faith actions.

It ceased nuclear and ballistic missile tests, destroyed a key nuclear site, and took important steps to normalize relations with Seoul, stepping back from the brink on the peninsula.

Defense ministers of both countries agreed to reduce military tensions on both sides of the border.

Effective November 1, a no-fly zone will be established along border areas. Both countries will halt artillery and other military drills near the demilitarized zone (DMZ).

Kim and South Korean President Moon Jae-in agreed to dismantle several armed guard posts inside the DMZ and create a Yellow Sea maritime peace zone.

These and other confidence building measures being discussed are good faith actions by both countries to step back from the brink on the peninsula.

Banning entry of warships and live-fire exercises by both countries around the so-called Northern Limit Line and other significant military-related measures may be established – positive steps to reduce tensions and improve relations.

Kim will meet with Moon in Seoul before yearend, a first ever summit between both sides in the South if occurs.

They’ll jointly bid to host the 2032 Olympic games. They signed a “Pyongyang Joint Declaration of September 2018 (PJD)” – political, economic and military provisions agreed on.

Kim and Moon want a formal peace treaty, Washington the obstacle to concluding one, wanting a state of war to persist despite the absence of hostilities since 1953.

Peace and stability on the peninsula defeat its imperial objectives, why formal conflict resolution on the peninsula has been unattainable for 65 years.

Nothing in prospect suggests this status will change – despite good faith intentions by Kim and Moon.

Other PJD provisions are positive steps. Both sides agreed to improved communications, consultations, and cooperation to enhance political and economic relations, along with avoiding military confrontation.

They’ll establish “east-coast and west-coast rail and road connections.” They’ll normalize the Gaeseong industrial complex and form “a west coast joint special economic zone and an east coast joint special tourism zone.”

They’ll cooperate “to protect and restore the natural ecology (including) forestry cooperation.”

They’ll jointly work to prevent epidemics, along with improving public health and medical care.

They’ll “strengthen humanitarian cooperation to fundamentally resolve the issue of separated families.”

They agreed to transform the peninsula “into a land of peace free from nuclear weapons and nuclear threats…”

Pyongyang will dismantle its Tongchange-ri missile engine test site and launch platform – monitored by experts from “relevant countries.”

The Yeongbyeon nuclear facility will be dismantled if the Trump regime takes reciprocal good faith steps – so far not forthcoming.

Kim and Moon will continue cooperating politically, economically and militarily, both leaders seeking a durable peace on the peninsula.

Washington rejects the idea, notably Pompeo and Bolton – why formally ending a state of war, guaranteeing DPRK security, and normalizing US relations with the country remain unattainable.

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My newest book as editor and contributor is titled “Flashpoint in Ukraine: How the US Drive for Hegemony Risks WW III.”

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Stephen Lendman
Stephen Lendman
Stephen Lendman was born in 1934 in Boston, MA. In 1956, he received a BA from Harvard University. Two years of US Army service followed, then an MBA from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania in 1960. After working seven years as a marketing research analyst, he joined the Lendman Group family business in 1967. He remained there until retiring at year end 1999. Writing on major world and national issues began in summer 2005. In early 2007, radio hosting followed. Lendman now hosts the Progressive Radio News Hour on the Progressive Radio Network three times weekly. Distinguished guests are featured. Listen live or archived. Major world and national issues are discussed. Lendman is a 2008 Project Censored winner and 2011 Mexican Journalists Club international journalism award recipient.